Phil Mickelson Called Suzann Pettersen After Solheim Cup

The Presidents Cup - Singles MatchesAmong those who reached out to Suzann Pettersen after the Solheim Cup controversy was someone who knows international drama all too well, U.S. fan favorite Phil Mickelson.

And, according to Pettersen, it was a lengthy conversation.

In an interview on Golf Channel’s “Golf Central” Wednesday night, Pettersen reflected on the incident that ruled the aftermath of the Solheim Cup, when U.S. player Alison Lee thought a putt on the 17th green was conceded only to have Pettersen argue it wasn’t. Pettersen and Charley Hull won the fourball match 2 up, but the U.S. won the cup 14 1/2 to 13 1/2.

During the interview, Pettersen said Mickelson called her Sunday night — not long after the matches concluded — and they talked for “hours.” They both work with Butch Harmon.

“One of the first players to reach out to me was Phil on Sunday night,” Pettersen said. “I don’t know how I can thank him enough for the words and the hours on the phone, the conversations we had for the good and bad. This went both ways. He wasn’t just trying to pat me on the shoulder, ‘like this will be fine.’ He asked me some critical questions, and I had to answer them. We all kind of ended on a good note.”

Mickelson, who will play in next week’s Presidents Cup, is no stranger to controversy during international events.

courtesy of Josh Berhow (golf.com)

 

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About Patrick Gonzalez

A wandered spirit at times, but passionate about family values, interested in world cultures, and taking the journey through life with vigor and no fear in trying something new. Patrick received his FAA pilot’s license in High School before acquiring a driver’s license. He still flies regularly to keep proficient in instrument and multi-engine ratings. Traveled all over the world while in the U.S. Navy and became very appreciative of different cultures. After his military service he grew a passion for golf and became a PGA professional. He authored “Golf’s Deadly Sins” and has over 30 years of teaching experience. Patrick says that experience has shown him that nothing invented by man will ever come at you harder than life itself. “It’s always better to be on the ground wishing that you were flying, than flying wishing you were on the ground.”

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