Like it or not? PGA Tour players and golf reviewers critique Chambers Bay prior to 2015 U.S. Open

Chambers Bay Par 3

It’s a yearly tradition: The United States Golf Association and Executive Director Mike Davis getting firmly into the psyches of the world’s best golfers. With 2015 U.S. Open host ChaIt’s a yearly tradition: The United States Golf Association and Executive Director Mike Davis getting firmly into the psyches of the world’s best golfers. With 2015 U.S. Open host Chambers Bay, the USGA voodoo appears to be well ahead of schedule.

It’s a novel, if not experimental concept for the U.S. Open, normally staged on Golden Era designs that are exclusive country clubs. With Chambers Bay, opened in 2007, the massive property that was formerly a sand and gravel quarry will draw record attendance. The course setup can change wildly day to day at the hands of the tournament committee thanks to long, ribbon tees and enormous putting surfaces.

Also unique in 2015, virtually no player will have the benefit of knowing the Robert Trent Jones Jr. design very well. The only other event it has hosted is the 2010 U.S. Amateur (2015 Masters champion Jordan Spieth shot a second-day 83 and missed qualifying for match play). The USGA then took that feedback to continue to develop the ideal test for the main event in 2015.

Davis said he believes players should take it upon themselves to visit the course many times prior to the event.

“I would contend that there is no way a player will have success here at Chambers Bay unless he really studies the golf course and learns it,” Davis said at U.S. Open media day. “The idea of coming in and playing two practice rounds and just walking it and using your yardage book, that person is done, will not win the U.S. Open.”

Some tour players like 2012 U.S. Open champion Webb Simpson have scoffed at the notion they have all sorts of free time to go out of their way to study the course. Others have been less than enthused with what they’ve seen. Henrik Stenson called it a “tricked-up links course.” Ryan Palmer had the most flamboyant comments following his visit.

“(Davis’) idea of tee boxes on down hills, up hills and side hills is ridiculous,” Palmer told USA Today’s Steve DiMeglio. “That’s not golf. I don’t care what anybody says. It will get a lot of bad press from the players. It is a joke. I don’t understand it. I just don’t know why they would do it.”

Chambers Bay rated by the daily-fee golfer

Whether or not the tour pros love the venue, regular golfers can revel in the fact Chambers Bay is the latest addition to the USGA’s shift toward publicly accessible U.S. Open venues. But the caveat is that the course has been under a watchful eye of the USGA and constantly tweaked and renovated ever since opening. Temporary greens and other operational interruptions, due in part because Chambers is wall-to-wall fescue grass, which can be tougher to manage than bent grass in the Pacific Northwest, have been a common occurrence, which some golfers haven’t been too happy about after plunking down $150-$200 or more for a round.

On Golf Advisor, Chambers Bay has had 14 reviews since summer 2013. (I played the course back in 2009 as part of a jaunt from Harding Park to Bandon Dunes to Chambers Bay.)

The most negative review on Golf Advisor came in June 2014 from golfer theonlybfc. He felt like a second-class citizen due to nets protecting parts of the fairways and four temp greens and awarded the experience one star.

“The greens were in worse shape than any muni course I have ever played,” he wrote. “Caddy said that we would be seeing seven different green speeds throughout the day, and he was right.”

Perhaps due to a full summer of added grow-in, reviews for the remainder of 2014 were very positive, with little mention of condition issues. Golf Advisor’s own Mike Bailey awarded the experience five stars. Golfer JLandenburg was a staunch defender of Chambers:

“This course is an incredible opportunity to learn a new kind of golf,” the single-digit handicapper wrote. “But many here are simply too closed minded to get it.”

courtesy of Brandon Tucker (golfadvisor.com)

 

This entry was posted in Golf, golf fundamental and tagged , , by Patrick Gonzalez. Bookmark the permalink.

About Patrick Gonzalez

A wandered spirit at times, but passionate about family values, interested in world cultures, and taking the journey through life with vigor and no fear in trying something new. Patrick received his FAA pilot’s license in High School before acquiring a driver’s license. He still flies regularly to keep proficient in instrument and multi-engine ratings. Traveled all over the world while in the U.S. Navy and became very appreciative of different cultures. After his military service he grew a passion for golf and became a PGA professional. He authored “Golf’s Deadly Sins” and has over 30 years of teaching experience. Patrick says that experience has shown him that nothing invented by man will ever come at you harder than life itself. “It’s always better to be on the ground wishing that you were flying, than flying wishing you were on the ground.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *