Cameron McCormick Joins Golf Channel And Revolution Golf

Cameron McCormick, 2015 PGA Teacher of the Year and long-time swing coach of three-time Major Champion Jordan Spieth, will become an official member of the team of expert instructors featured on Revolution Golf and Golf Channel. The announcement was made today during McCormick’s guest appearance on Morning Drive.

Watch a clip from McCormick’s appearance on Morning Drive here.

As part of the new multi-year relationship, McCormick will host his own instructional series – featured on both Revolution Golf and Golf Channel – where he will share with golfers the knowledge he has cultivated over a 20-year coaching career, along with his creative approach to incorporating a wider perspective on what it takes to improve golf performance.

McCormick also will join Martin Hall, Sean Foley, Martin Chuck and Andrew Rice as featured faculty members on Revolution Golf, the largest direct-to-consumer digital platform in golf, which was added to NBC Sports Group’s portfolio in August. By connecting golfers of all skill levels to world-class instruction, Revolution Golf will feature the first series of instructional videos hosted by McCormick on the website before the end of the year. An accompanying DVD series is scheduled to be released in November.

“I couldn’t be more excited to partner with Golf Channel and Revolution Golf in their efforts to enhance and grow the way fans receive golf instruction,” said McCormick. “At the core of every golfer is a desire to improve their skill set, Golf Channel and Revolution Golf are allowing us to do just that. I am thrilled to join the team and provide viewers with a unique approach to instruction that they can trust.”

A Texas-based native of Melbourne, Australia, McCormick is the director of instruction at Trinity Forest Golf Club in Dallas, a Ben Crenshaw-Bill Coore design, which will serve as host of the 2018 AT&T Byron Nelson on the PGA TOUR. After playing college golf for Texas Tech University, he briefly played professionally before beginning a teaching career in 1998. In addition to Jordan Spieth, his renowned roster of students includes more than 13 PGA, Web.com and LPGA Tour players, 10 of the Top-100 players in the World Junior Golf Rankings, and four of Top-100 players in the World Amateur Golf Rankings.

Courtesy of The Golf Wire

A hard way to make a living: Here are the 12 worst jobs in golf

You know what they say: a bad day of golf is still better than a good day of work, especially if your work is one of these 12 gigs.

BEVERAGE CART DRIVER AT BOOZY CORPORATE OUTING

If there’s anything more awkward than the ham-fisted flirtations of a pudgy middle-aged man with booze on his breath, it’s the wan smile on the face of a patient young woman mixing yet another cocktail for her sloppy suitor and wondering when her shift will ever end.

RULES OFFICIAL IN FINAL GROUP OF MAJOR

The way tournaments have been going these days, odds are something’s going to happen—and when it does, you best know the 600-plus pages of the Decision on the Rule of Golf like you do your kids’ birthdays.

DRIVING RANGE PICKER

Like Mad Max on a fuel run, he heads out in his rickety, jerry-rigged ride, fully aware of the grim fate that awaits him. In an instant he is spotted by club-wielding barbarians with bucket-loads of ammo and brainless ambitions. On the course, these heathens rarely hit a green in regulation. But on the range they unleash screamers with frightening precision, whooping in celebration as they rattle the mesh cage around our hero, who, regardless of what he’s earning, should really be getting paid a whole lot more.

COURSE AMBASSADOR AT JAM-PACKED RESORT

Though it may sound grandiose, “ambassador” is an apt title for a role that strains even the finest diplomatic skills. Pressed by antsy golfers to get things moving, our on-course Kissinger drives ahead for delicate negotiations with a stubborn, sluggish foursome, who remind him haughtily that they’ve paid their $400 so they’ll take six hours if they damn well please. Ever tactful, even in the face of such surly nonsense, our ambassador strikes a statesman-like balance between persistence and politeness. But he has no real power. As the pace of play crawls on, he rides away muttering to himself, “You came out of retirement for this?”

CADDIE ON THE BAG OF ARROGANT HACK

A caddie’s job is to keep up and shut up. That part’s easy. The hard part comes when the player does neither, banging balls all over the planet while droning on incessantly about himself and his game. Being the insufferable fellow that he is, he also blames his looper for misreading putts that he barely gets rolling and misclubbing him on irons that he flat-out shanks. He caps the miserable day by failing to tip.

LOWEST RANKING CADDIE IN THE CADDYSHACK

Forced to wait all day for a single loop, he finally gets one. It turns out to be the guy described above.

CAMERA OPERATOR IN CHERRY PICKER

As if an eight-hour shift under a broiling sun isn’t hard enough, there’s nowhere to relieve yourself. Well, expect for that Gatorade bottle.

HEAD PRO AT SUFFOCATINGLY STUFFY PRIVATE CLUB

He got into this line of work because he loved the game, not because he dreamed of playing yes-man to a pack of self-important Judge Smails-types who find reason to complain in everything from the speed of the greens and plushness of the fairways to the offending branches of a 300-year-old oak tree they’re bent on seeing removed.

ASSISTANT PRO WHO HAS NEVER HAD A WEEKEND OFF

The last time he played, he shot a tidy 67. That was 11 years ago.

BALL-HAWKER DIVING INTO GATOR-INFESTED WATER HAZARDS

On the one hand, we respect the bravery and bull-headedness required to don a wetsuit and plunge into a festering, predator-filled pond in the hopes of recovering some ProV1s, which reliably re-sell for as much as a buck each. On the other hand, we wonder: has your brain gone cloudy from the bends?

GOLF LISTICLE WRITER

Years ago, when life spread out before you like a bright green promise, you dreamed of one day penning the Great American Novel. But now, in the age of Trump and Twitter, your own limited talents, combined with the limited attention span of readers, have reduced you to what you were probably meant to be: the author of a zillion golf-related lists. Hey, let’s see you try to do this.

Courtesy of Josh Jens (golf.com)

UPDATED: Napa fire burns grandstands hours after Safeway Open ends, forces evacuation of Silverado Resort

JOSH EDELSON
A tent structure built for the 2017 Safeway Open burns on a golf course at the Silverado Resort and Spa.

A fire early Monday forced the evacuation of Silverado Resort & Spa in Napa only hours after the completion of the PGA Tour’s season-opening Safeway Open.

Mitch Cosentino, a prominent winemaker in the Napa Valley, an avid golfer and friend to many on the PGA Tour, posted this on his Facebook page about 1:30 a.m. (PDT): SILVERADO COUNTRY CLUB IS IN DANGER. THE FIRES HAVE COME DOWN PAST William Hill Winery. Both sides of Hardman Rd are burning across from the driving range at the Country Club. This has passed thru a very good Cab Sauv vineyard just north of the 5th hole. I was supposed to pick Thursday. Likely no good now. Who knows what has happened to William Hill Winery.”

“Several massive wildfires burned out of control in Napa and Sonoma counties early Monday, destroying an untold number of homes and businesses, forcing the evacuation of many thousands of people and shutting down major roadways as firefighters sought to halt the advance of infernos that were driven by powerful winds,” this story in the San Francisco Chronicle said.

“Guests of the Silverado Resort and Spa on Atlas Peak Road said they had been evacuated in a rush as flames approached. The resort had hosted the Safeway Open, a PGA Tour event, which ended Sunday.

“’We were sleeping, but we kept smelling smoke,’ said Chris Thomas, 42, of Kirkland, Wash., who arrived in the Napa Valley late Sunday with his wife, Marissa Schneider, for a wine-tasting trip.”

It is not yet known whether any tour players were still at the resort, though tournament host Johnny Miller has a condominium there. Miller, on Golf Channel’s telecast on Sunday, made note of the strong winds. “This is a very unusual wind. … To have that north wind blowing out of nowhere after three days of just mild little breezes it makes it a lot tougher.”

Courtesy of John Strege (golfworld.com)