Edward Norton v. Alec Baldwin: Hollywood goes head to head over proposed Hamptons golf course

Actors Edward Norton and Alec Baldwin are the latest high-profile activists on either side of the proposed Hills resort on Long Island.

A proposed golf community in the Hamptons is causing a lot of controversy, and now Hollywood heavyweights are taking sides.

For the better part of a year, actor Alec Baldwin has become an outspoken ally of some Hamptons residents who oppose the construction of The Hills, an 18-hole golf course, clubhouse and 118-luxury home resort plot on 600 acres in East Quogue, New York. The parcel of land is owned by the Arizona-based Discovery Land Company and headed up by developer Mike Meldman, who names actor Edward Norton as a friend.

Though the community on Long Island has been split for years on the development, Norton has only recently come on board to help advise Meldman and his company on how to prevent water pollution, one of the residents’ main concerns. Many worry that the proposed development will prove to be disastrous for the East End environment, while others in support think the project will help bolster the Hamptons economy. Norton is the president of the U.S. board of the Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust and a UN goodwill ambassador for biodiversity, and has worked with technology that removes nitrogen from runoff previously.

A report stated that Meldman will employ Baswood waste treatment, of which Norton is the chair of the board, to handle the Hills project.

Baldwin is concerned that companies like Meldman’s have too much leeway in the practices used to develop these land parcels, thanks to an area rezoning legislation known as planned development districts, or PDDs. A PDD’s goal is to encourage more flexibility and creativity in designing residential, commercial, industrial and mixed use areas than is currently allowed under conventional land use regulations. Baldwin, who is an Amagansett resident, released a public service announcement in 2016 in support of repealing the legislation, specifically naming the Hills in his plea.

“The biggest and baddest development on Long Island is The Hills at Southampton proposed mega golf resort on some 500 acres of land that is the largest privately owned Pine Barrens parcel remaining on Long Island,” Baldwin said.

Norton’s involvement comes a few months before the development’s third and final public hearing in June.

“The project represents a much lower density development with much greater retention of open space and ecology than the development zoning allowed for or had originally planned,” Norton said. “Without any doubt, a cutting-edge wastewater treatment system gives the community the opportunity to reduce nitrogen contamination of the inland waterways, which is critical.”

 

Agent: Tiger still undecided on Masters, report that suggests otherwise is “comical”

After withdrawing from the Dubai Desert Classic, Tiger Woods’ status for the Masters is still up in the air.

We’re less than three weeks away from the Masters, and it’s still unclear if Tiger Woods will play or not.

This “will he or won’t he?” isn’t new regarding Woods and the season’s first major. He missed the 2014 and ’16 Masters with reports coming in all along the way about his health and practice regimen. This year appears to be no different.

On Friday, Golf Digest released a report with sources claiming Woods hasn’t been able to play or practice since back spasms forced his withdrawal from the Dubai Desert Classic. Mark Steinberg, Woods’ agent, offered the following rebuttal to the Golf Channel where he specifically mentions the author, Brian Wacker.

“I have no idea who Mr. Wacker’s really close sources are,” Steinberg said. “I can tell you this, nobody spoke to him; so how he could know something that Tiger and I don’t know is comical. I talked to Tiger four hours ago on the phone. We’re not in a situation to even talk about playing in the Masters now. He’s gotten treatments and is progressing and hoping he can do it. There’s not been a decision one way or the other. I couldn’t give you a fair assessment, but to say it’s doubtful is an absolutely inaccurate statement.”

The most interesting takeaway: Even though the opening round of the Masters is 19 days away, Woods isn’t in “a situation to even talk about playing in the Masters.”

Steinberg was also asked about Woods’ practice routine, and he said, “I don’t want to talk about specifics yet. When we’re ready to get into that, we’ll disclose it. He’s working hard at getting better, he’s working hard at progressing.”

Woods will be in New York City on Monday to sign copies of his new book. If you’re in the area, you can go straight to the source and ask him about his Masters plans yourself.

courtesy of Coleman McDowell (golf.com)

Tour Confidential: Do pros owe it to Arnie to play Bay Hill this week?

Arnold Palmer talks with Justin Rose just off the 18th green during the final round of the Arnold Palmer Invitational in 2016.

Only 10 of the top 25 players in the World Ranking will tee it up at the Arnold Palmer Invitational, which prompted Billy Horschel to tweet: “Disappointing. Totally understand schedule issues. But 1st year without AP. Honor an icon! Without him wouldn’t be in position we are today.” While the turnout might seem underwhelming, only nine of the top 25 played last year at Bay Hill. Do the pros owe it to Arnie to play at the event that bears his name? Or is a cramped schedule that features a couple of WGC events in the run-up to the Masters to blame?

Jeff Ritter, digital development editor, Sports Illustrated Golf Group (@Jeff_Ritter): It would certainly be nice to see a bigger turnout from the top-ranked players, but the rerouted “Florida Swing,” which now passes through Mexico City for a WGC event, throws a wrench into travel plans for the top 60. Arnie deserves all the tributes that can ever be given, but players also need to do what’s best to prepare for Augusta. The API is in a tough spot on the calendar. Hopefully it can slide to a friendlier week when the Tour re-works the schedule.

Josh Sens, contributing writer, GOLF (@JoshSens): I hate to drift into the area of moralizing “shoulds” and “shouldn’ts” but this was a big symbolic miss for professional golf, to say nothing of a blown PR opportunity. Yeah, schedules are tight, but these guys had plenty of time to adjust theirs. When Palmer passed away, it could have been a time for everyone to do everything they could to show up at the first one. A big show of force in support of the man who did so much to shape the game. I understand the idea of gearing up for the Masters. But there was a time when gearing up for the Masters meant showing up in Augusta and playing practice rounds. What’s wrong with that?

John Wood, caddie for Matt Kuchar (@johnwould): Players simply cannot play every event, especially with the Masters on approach. The top players set a schedule that gives them the best chance to compete at courses that fit their game, as well as in terms of being in the right frame of mind and physical condition to compete at the Masters, and all of the majors. Would it be wonderful if everyone got together to play at Bay Hill this year to honor Palmer? Sure. But the schedule is very cramped, and you can’t blame the guys who don’t play.

Michael Bamberger, senior writer, Sports Illustrated: The best way to honor Arnold is to be genuine with fans, play with some flair (if you got it!), talk to the writers (and the TV people) and remember that the game made you, not vice-versa. Going to Bay Hill is a one-off gesture of no particular consequence.

Joe Passov, senior editor, GOLF (@joepassov): I’m torn here. The same thing happened at the AT&T Byron Nelson a few years back. When Byron was alive, all the top stars showed up at his tournament, even though there were few fans of the host course, simply because they had so much respect for the man himself. After his passing, the top names stayed away in droves. I’m almost persuaded by JW’s argument that the players need to do what’s best for them and their careers, especially in regards to the Masters run-up, but ultimately, I’m with Josh on this one. At least show up this very first year after the King has left us, pay your respects, and whatever you do in 2018 and beyond, fine.

courtesy of Golf Wire

Phil Mickelson thrills crowd with over-the-trees shot

Phil Mickelson had some high-flying thrills for fans during Round 3 of the WGC-Mexico Championship.

We’ll never get tired of Phil Mickelson doing Phil Mickelson things. He didn’t disappoint during the third round of the WGC-Mexico Championship, either.

Mickelson treated crowds to two chip-ins for birdie earlier in his round, but it was his high-flying tree shots that really got the fans riled up.

Sitting one shot off the lead at the turn, Mickelson sent his tee shot on the 10th way left towards an adjacent fairway. But upon going to search for his ball, neither he, nor caddie Jim ‘Bones’ Mackay, nor officials could locate it. It was determined that a fan had picked up his ball, so Mickelson was free to take a drop without penalty. The challenge? There were rows of people and impossibly high trees in the way.

No problem for Mickelson. He sent his second shot high over the top, landing it just feet away from the hole. Unfortunately, he missed his birdie putt — but the par save was one for the Lefty books.

courtesy of EXTRA SPIN STAFF